Scientific Papers

JAP – Scientific Paper – Cell Culture Model of Sleep Apnea

Cell Culture Model of Sleep Apnea
Cell Culture Model of Sleep Apnea

University: Spanish Ministry of Economy, Competitiveness–Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Spanish Association Against Cancer, Centres de Recerca de Catalunya CERCA
Authors: Noelia Campillo, Bryan Falcones, Josep M. Montserrat, David Gozal, Ana Obeso, Teresa Gallego-Martin, Daniel Navajas, Isaac Almendros, and Ramon Farré
Journal: JAP – Journal of Applied Physiology
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TITLE: Frequency and magnitude of intermittent hypoxia modulate endothelial wound healing in a cell culture model of sleep apnea.

ABSTRACT: Intermittent hypoxia (IH) has been implicated in the cardiovascular consequences of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, the lack of suitable experimental systems has precluded assessment as to whether IH is detrimental, protective, or both for the endothelium.
The aim of the work was to determine the effects of frequency and amplitude of IH oxygenation swings on aortic endothelial wound healing. Monolayers of human primary endothelial cells were wounded and subjected to constant oxygenation (1%, 4%, 13%, or 20% O2) or IH at different frequencies (0.6, 6, or 60 cycles/h) and magnitude ranges (13–4% O2 or 20–1% O2), using a novel well-controlled system, with wound healing being measured after 24 h.
Cell monolayer repair was similar at 20% O2 and 13% O2, but was considerably increased (approximately twofold) in constant hypoxia at 4% O2. The magnitude and frequency of IH considerably modulated wound healing. Cycles ranging 13–4% O2 at the lowest frequency (0.6 cycles/h) accelerated endothelial wound healing by 102%.
However, for IH exposures consisting of 20% to 1% O2 oscillations, wound closure was reduced compared with oscillation in the 13–4% range (by 74% and 44% at 6 cycles/h and 0.6 cycles/h, respectively). High-frequency IH patterns simulating severe OSA (60 cycles/h) did not significantly modify endothelial wound closure, regardless of the oxygenation cycle amplitude.

In conclusion, the frequency and magnitude of hypoxia cycling in IH markedly alter wound healing responses and emerge as key factors determining how cells will respond in OSA.

FULL AND ORIGINAL SCIENTIFIC PAPER: JAP – Journal of Applied Physiology